Relocating Roof Antenna to Eave

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Relocating Roof Antenna to Eave

allenLC
Extra

I need to relocate my Dish roof antenna to my eave or 2nd story wall (both within 10-15 ft of existing antenna location and with a clear view in the direction of the satelite) because I am replacing my roof within the next month due to hurricane Harvey damage.  I DO NOT WANT the antenna mounted to the roof since I live in huricane country with 120 mph building code requirements; and the holes would violate the new roof leak warranty.  The house has had 2 direct huricane hits in 10 years.  A 6' pole on the ground would probably be blocked by trees.  I reinforced the old location with a 2"x12" (below the roof decking) for the screws to grab but that still has the leak problem and is not as strong as connecting to the structural rafters/studs.

 

Where can I get a mount for the antenna that I can screw firmly into the rafters or wall studs?  The current antenna is labeled Dsih TurboHD.   What diameter is the Dish antenna pipe/tubing?  I would rather my contractor (who is already doing repair work on the house) attach the mount to the house.  The existing cable is more than sufficient in length to reach the proposed location.  Would I need a technician to re-aim the antenna or could it be done with a phone app and watching the signal strength value on the Hopper?

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Re: Relocating Roof Antenna to Eave

DISH Employee

allenLC, Yes a homeowner can align a DISH if they know the proper skew, elevation and azimuth. A phone app can be used to do so along with looking at the signal strength on the receiver increase. Anything above 42 signal strength is considered good. Now, if it is not working, DISH can send out a technician. For these work orders if will come with a $50 charge as it will be considered a "Custom Work Order" . This would be due to the DISH being moved from its original installation location. 

4 Replies

Re: Relocating Roof Antenna to Eave

d4g4m
Visual Engineer

You don't mount the pipe to anything. You use the mounting plate that is attached to the pipe. The plate can be mounted to anything. When you refer to 'eave' I'll assume you mean the facia of the overhang. On most newer homes, it is either a 2x4 or a 2x6 painted or covered with aluminum.  The plate can be mounted with two  large screws [top & bottom] To make mounting easier, remove the two bolts holding the pipe. Remember your elevation setting. Place the plate on th facia, mark the holes, drill a small pilot hole, mount the plate, install the pipe/dish.

With tree interference, whatever your elevation setting, the sats are actually 12 degrees higher in the sky.

Re: Relocating Roof Antenna to Eave

allenLC
Extra

d4g4m,  Thanks for the reply but I don't think you understand how much force a hurricane places on an antenna or any external structure.  My existing standard roof mount is reinforced with 2 triangulated braces and the mount lag screws were screwed through the roof decking and into a 2"x12" which was connected with screws to the rafters.  This allowed the antenna to survive more than 2 hours of 100-110 mph wind (the eye of Ike went directly over the house - zero house damage).  My antenna survived and a lot of other peoples didn't.  If the mount rips off it can take some of the roof decking with it allowing a lot of rain to enter the house.  Harvey dumped 52 inches of rain on my house in 3 days.  So I am a little paranoid about hurricanes.

You are correct that by eave I meant the overhang of the roof.  Since writing my earlier post, I have found a Perfect Vision Under-Eave Mount for DirecTV that looks strong enough and an adapter is available to work with the smaller Dish mast diameter.  The main bracket would attach to the wall
with 2 lag screws into a wall stud and the other 2 using toggle bolts through the 1/2" OSB wall structural sheathing and the concrete board siding.  The mount also has 2 triangulated braces which can be screwed into the bottom of the 2x6 ceiling joists of the overhang which are covered with concrete fascia board.

So my remaining question is can a homeowner align an antenna?  Based on your details at the end of your post; I can infer that if I document the previous antenna elevation and orientation, plus use the Hopper signal strength reading and
possibly a phone app; I should be able to align the antenna without a Dish tech.

Re: Relocating Roof Antenna to Eave

DISH Employee

allenLC, Yes a homeowner can align a DISH if they know the proper skew, elevation and azimuth. A phone app can be used to do so along with looking at the signal strength on the receiver increase. Anything above 42 signal strength is considered good. Now, if it is not working, DISH can send out a technician. For these work orders if will come with a $50 charge as it will be considered a "Custom Work Order" . This would be due to the DISH being moved from its original installation location. 

Re: Relocating Roof Antenna to Eave

allenLC
Extra

KarolenaP,  Thank you for the clear answer that covered everything.